RV Life

We are currently living out of a 2019 Coachmen Leprechaun 27QB “Class C” RV that we bought used in August 2020.

Upcoming Travel Schedule

We make our upcoming travel schedule available here. Just note that we like to maintain a very flexible travel schedule, so you might not see very much. Also, while we currently have travel scheduled in 2021, much of this is subject to change due to the coronavirus pandemic.

How Much Does It Cost to RV?

We will give a full picture of our exact costs for RVing once we have time to compile and publish it. For now, here’s our fuel efficiency and costs:

This is for our gas-powered RV with a 2018 Ford E350 drive chassis. Our generator also runs off of the gasoline tank. So, our efficiency drops when we utilize the generator (e.g. at rest stops and when bookdocking).

Speaking of boondocking, you can join Harvest Hosts at 15% off through our referral link.

How We Get Data to Work Full-Time on the Road

When we traveled all around the world, we used (and recommend) Google Fi. The simplicity of landing in a new country and getting connected within a matter of minutes was a gamechanger. But, when we got back to the U.S., we found that Google Fi frankly sucked. We couldn’t get data for weeks in Tampa, needing to rely solely on Wi-Fi. And customer service was a joke.

After looking at a lot of data maps and reading what service others recommend, we switched from Google Fi to Verizon. I got the Play More Unlimited plan, and Katie got the Do More Unlimited plan. Both plans include 15GB per month of high-speed hotspot data.

We were able to stay under this quota for the first few months by limiting our laptop browsing, watching videos on our phones, and using Wi-Fi when available. But, in early November, we had both blown through much of our data. So, we both upgraded to the Get More Unlimited plan — which includes 30GB of high-speed hotspot data each month.

Honestly, we assumed that data was going to be the biggest hassle and limitation to living on the road. But, it hasn’t been an issue at all. We mostly book sites through recreation.gov, which prompts reviewers to note cell phone coverage in their reviews:

We have found that the reviews actually understate the level of connection that’s at the campgrounds we’ve stayed at. For example, we have “excellent coverage” (per the description) at this campground that has just a 2.7 rating.